Transcibed by Kristy Lawrie Gravlin - hannah@teleport.com


The Town of Alabama, Genesee County, New York as taken from The Gazetteer and Business Directory of Genesee County, N.Y. for 1869-70; Compiled and published by Hamilton Child, Syracuse, NY, 1869. Alabama, named from the State of Alabama, and signifying, ³Here we rest,² was formed from Shelby (Orleans Co.) and Pembroke, as ³Gerrysville², April 17, 1826. It was the intention to name it in honor of David GARY, one of the early settlers, but instead it was named for Elbridge GERRY, Ex-Vice President. Its name was changed April 21, 1828. A part of Wales was annexed in 1832. It is the north~west corner town of the County. The surface is level or gently undulating. The north and west portions are covered by marshes, forming a part of the Tonawanda Swamp. Oak Orchard Creek flows across the north~east corner, and Tonawanda Creek across the south~west corner. The Tonawanda Creek Feeder extends through the north~west part. A limestone terrace, from 50 to 75 feet high, extends across the south part of the town. Tonawanda Creek flows down this declivity in a perpendicular cascade, known as Tonawanda Falls, furnishing a fine water~power. The Tonawanda Indian Reservation embraces the south~west part. Near the center of the north border of the town are the ³Oak Orchard Acid Springs,² situated a few rods from the banks of the Creek. There are nine of these springs, all of which are situated within a circle of fifty rods. They issue from mounds, evidently formed by the action of the water, and elevated from two and a half to four feet above the surrounding surface. No two of these springs are alike, and in one instance three springs issue from a single mound within ten feet of each other, and yet the waters are essentially different. The following is an analysis of the three principal springs, the first by Profs. SILLIMAN and NORTON, the others by Prof. E. EMMONS: No. 1 Sulphuric Acid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134.732 Proto~Sulphate of Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28.623 Sulphate of Alumina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.690 ³ Lime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74.891 ³ Magnesia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35.596 ³ Potash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.519 ³ Soda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.343 Chloride of Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.434 ³ Silica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.592 ~~~~~ Total Grains . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314.420 ________ No. 2 Sulphate of Lime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.552 ³ Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.904 ³ Magnesia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.623 Free Sulphuric Acid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.132 ³ Organic Matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.360 ³ Silica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.230 ~~~~~ Total Grains in a pint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24.801 No. 3 Free Sulphuric Acid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.414 Sulphate of Lime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.736 ³ Iron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.920 ³ Magnesia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.236 Organic Matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.100 Silica, a trace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.000 ~~~~~ Total Grains in a pint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18.406 Large quantities of this water are bottled and sold annually for medicinal purposes. The soil of the town is a gravelly and sandy loam, with a clay subsoil. Alabama Center ( Alabama p.o.) is situated near the center of the town, and contains two churches, viz., Methodist and Baptist, a hotel, several stores and mechanic shops, and about thirty dwellings. Wheatville, (p.v.) in the north~east part, contains a F. W. Baptist church, a store and about a dozen dwellings.

Smithville (South Alabama p.o.) in the eastern part, contains a Baptist church, several mechanic shops and about twenty~five dwellings. The first settlement was made in 1806 by James WALSWORTH, who had previously spent a few years in Orleans County. Among other early settlers were Robert HARPER, Jesse LUND, Dr. SMITH from Vermont; and Peter, Joseph and James HOLMES from Delaware County. The first births were those of twin children of James WALSWORTH, in 1806; the first death was that of an unknown traveler, at the house of Mr. Walsworth, in 1808. He was buried without a coffin or religious services. The first school was taught by Henry HOWARD, in 1817; the first inn was kept by James WALSWORTH, in 1808; and the first store by Nahum LORING,, in 1828. The first sawmill was erected in 1824, by Samuel WHITCOMB at Wheatville. The first church (F. W. Bap.) was formed in the east part of the town, in 1824, by Elder Samuel WHITCOMB, the first preacher.

The population of the town in 1865 was 1,839, and its area 27,904 acres. The number of school districts in which there are school houses is 11, employing the same number of teachers. The number of children of school age is 681; the number attending school, 566; the average attendance, 261, and the amount expended for school purposes during the year ending September 30, 1868, was $3,074.53.

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